Should this former Deloitte accountant become a doctor?

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One of the key attributes of finance and business people should be ethical behaviour. Note that I say “should be” as not everyone seems to agree with this approach.

Former Deloitte UK employee Nahied Kabir seems to have a slightly different view of what is acceptable in terms of ethical behavior.

Here’s a quick multiple choice question for you to see how ethical you are compared to Mr. Kabir.

Question – You’re struggling a bit with your professional exams and your employer’s policy is that if you don’t pass your exam within 2 attempts you’ll lose your job. Do you:

a) Focus your efforts on passing your exams. Or,

b) Focus your efforts on forging two doctor’s certificate.

Now, in my opinion (and hopefully in your opinion as well!) the correct answer is (b) (a).

Alas for former Deloitte employee Mr. Kabir he chose option (b).

In summary, Mr. Kabir failed an exam twice and at a meeting to discuss terminating his employment contract with Deloitte he produced a forged doctor’s note.

Deloitte let him sit the exam again and he passed this time. He then had a further 3 exams to sit and you guessed it he failed all 3.

At the next meeting to discuss things with Deloitte he claimed that he failed due to the ill health of his mother. He then produced a second forged doctor’s note from another doctor claiming his mother was suffering from ill health.

Proving that as well as being a pretty rubbish accountant he was also pretty bad at forging letters, the forged letter from the second doctor was exactly the same as the forged letter from the first doctor with the exception of only 4 words!

It’s probably no surprise to you that Mr. Kabir is now no longer working with Deloitte and the accounting body he was sitting his exams with (ICAEW) have published their report on the disciplinary action they took against him.

Again, it’s probably no surprise that he was “declared unfit to become a member of ICAEW”.

There’s no news yet whether Mr. Kabir is planning a successful career as a bank note forger…

Would you prefer to read it or watch it?

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Marie Claire is one of the leading women’s magazines in the world. It was first published 75 years ago in France and now has various editions around the world.

Although I must admit that I haven’t read a copy in detail I’m told by some of the ladies in the office that it’s a good mix of fashion, beauty and health.

Next month’s issue though is going to have something which has never been seen before in a UK women’s magazine.

Now, I’m not talking about a woman’s magazine writing about the latest football results or the new Range Rover car that has just been released. No, instead I’m talking about a pretty innovative advert.

On pages 34 and 35 of next month’s magazine there will be a 45 second video advert. Yes, that’s right – a 45 second video will be embedded into the pages of the magazine so that when the relevant pages are opened the video will start to play.

Very impressive.

The video advert is produced using technology by US company Americhip and will be for a perfume by luxury fashion house Dolce & Gabbana and reportedly will feature two models posing near a coastal scene.

There’s a constant challenge for advertisers to identify eye catching adverts and this video advert embedded within the magazine will certainly be eye catching.

It will also no doubt be very expensive and the cost of including the video advert has not been disclosed. Interestingly the company that will be paying for the advert is Proctor & Gamble as they are the company that produces the perfume under license from Dolce & Gabbana.

Oh and before you all rush out to buy the magazine it’s worth checking that your copy includes the advert as due to cost reasons not all copies will have the advert in it. If you are lucky enough to get hold of a copy with the video in then it will no doubt be a good read or should I say a good watch.

Is this the best advert at the Olympics?

So the Olympics are well and truly underway and whilst a lot of the athletes have been inspirational in terms of their performance there have also been some inspirational performances by businesses.

There are a number of official Olympic sponsors (for example, McDonald’s, Coca-Cola, BMW and Visa). These companies have paid the Olympic authorities big amounts of money to be official sponsors.

LOCOG (the London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games) have been particularly vigilant in terms of monitoring for any unauthorised use of the Olympic name or Olympic logo by companies which are not official Olympic sponsors. For example, they have swiftly taken action against any company that has illegally used the Olympic name in advertising.

Irish bookmaker Paddy Power has got a reputation for, how can I put it but controversial or cheeky advertising.

A few days before the start of the Olympics, Paddy Power sponsored an egg and spoon race (a children’s race where children run whilst trying to balance an egg on a spoon).

This egg and spoon race took place in a small French town. The nice thing though was that this small French town was called London and as a result Paddy Power designed their latest poster advertising campaign with the following text:

“Official sponsor of the largest athletics event in London this year! Ahem, London France that is).”

LOCOG instructed their lawyers to get the posters removed but Paddy Power’s lawyers successfully pointed out that they had not broken any law and the posters remained in place.

A great example of gorilla marketing and a gold medal performance by Paddy Power.

ACCA or CIMA – who’s in the driving seat?

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ACCA and CIMA are both great professional qualifications which are respected and admired around the world. I came across a surprising fact recently though which I bet the majority of ACCA and CIMA members and students never knew.

Nissan Motor Co. Ltd is one of the world’s leading car manufacturers and a couple of months ago over in Japan they launched a new car.

Quoting some of Nissan’s promotional material about the car, some of the key features include:

– Styling expressing a premium class image

– Hybrid system with optimally balanced driving and environmental performance

– Spacious and comfortable rear seats

As the picture shows it’s a handsome looking car and I’d personally be more than happy to drive it around.

What about Helen Brand (the Chief Executive of ACCA) or Charles Tilley (the Chief Executive of CIMA) though?

Do you think they would be happy to be seen driving the car?

Well, my guess is that one of them will be happier than the other as the name of the new Nissan car is none other than the Nissan Cima.

Yes, that’s right – one of the leading car manufacturers in the world has just launched the Cima car.

Nissan has not produced a car aimed at accountants in Japan but instead the Cima car name is derived from the Spanish for “summit”.

It raises an interesting question though – does this mean that there’s no need to study for your exams to become a CIMA member as all you’ll need to do is to buy a Cima car and then you can add Cima (driver) to your CV?

Oh, and one final thing but I don’t think there’s any truth to the rumours that ACCA are currently in discussions with Toyota to produce a new car called the Toyota Acca.

Tennis star’s balls fall out of his shorts…

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Adidas and Puma are two of the top sportswear brands in the world.

Interestingly though they were actually started by two brothers.

In the 1920s in Germany, brothers Adolf and Rudolf Dassler set up a shoe making business but soon fell out with each other and went their separate ways.

Adolf (Adi) Dassler kept the original company but renamed it Adidas (named after his first name and part of his surname) whilst Rudolf left and set up Puma.

Since the split there has been intense rivalry between the two companies and over the years there have been some famous examples of both of them trying to outdo the other in terms of publicity.

For example, back in the 1970s at the start of the 1970 World Cup final, arguably the world’s best ever footballer famously stopped the referee with a last minute request to tie his shoelaces just before the kickoff. The result was that millions of TV viewers saw Pele tie up his Puma football boots.

An early example of “guerrilla marketing” and priceless publicity for Puma.

More recently there was some rather unusual publicity for Adidas.

At the recent Wimbledon tennis Championship in London, the unlucky losing finalist Andy Murray had a few problems with his shorts.

Adidas pay a significant sum to Murray to sponsor him and in return he wears Adidas tennis gear, including Adidas shorts.

In his Wimbledon match against fellow Adidas sponsored tennis player Marcos Baghdatis, he lost two points after a tennis ball fell out of his Adidas shorts mid-point (Murray puts one tennis ball in his pocket whilst taking his first serve in case he needs to take a second serve).

Luckily for Murray he went on to win his match against Baghdatis but for Adidas it could have been an embarrassing problem had he lost because of the design of their shorts.

Adidas reportedly said that the error in the depth of the pockets was due to the shorts being handmade.

There’s a saying that there’s no such thing as bad publicity and to be honest this has probably turned out ok for Adidas.

More people are probably now aware that Adidas sponsor Murray and they will no doubt change the design of the pockets so there’s no danger of the public seeing one of Murray’s balls popping out of his shorts in the future.

Are you strong enough to buy this?

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Now let me think. Drinking lots of beer and running as hard as you can into a metal vending machine. What could possibly go wrong?

In today’s competitive business environment it’s normally the case that companies want to make it as easy as possible for their customers to buy their products.

Over in Argentina though a beer company has taken an unusual (but in my opinion a brilliant) approach to selling beer.

In fact, if you’re talking in strategic exam business terminology, an unusual approach to the outbound logistics found within Michael Porter’s value chain.

Salta beer has designed a vending machine for all the rugby fans out there.

In order to get your can of beer dispensed from the vending machine you put your money in and then you have to body slam into the vending machine as hard as you can.

The nice twist to this is that there is a meter on the vending machine which is similar to the “hammer strength tests” that used to be found at old carnivals and fairgrounds. In other words, the beer will only be dispensed if you can run into the machine with a hard enough force and reach the “strength meter”.

It’s been designed to appeal to rugby fans who are used to seeing rugby players tackling their opponents.

The machine can be seen in action below and the next time you are sat down in a quiet Argentinean bar enjoying a relaxed drink lookout for the big guy behind you taking a long run-up and heading with his shoulder down towards the vending machine…

I’d love to invite you to lunch but…

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Have you ever been to lunch with a colleague?

My guess is that unless (a) you work by yourself, (b) nobody likes you , or (c) you have a serious body odour problem then the chances are that you have had lunch with a colleague.

Now let me guess. What did you talk about over lunch?

Was it by any chance “work”?

Yes, we all do it. If we go out for lunch with a colleague then a lot of the time we’ll probably end up talking about work. Now, this could be the latest racy gossip about Mr X and Mrs Y but the chances are it may well just be about some project you are currently working on.

So is this a problem that you are talking about work over lunch?

Tech giant Apple seem to think that there could be some issues over talking about work whilst eating your lunch. They have just announced plans to open a restaurant which is reserved solely for employees.

This isn’t an on-site canteen or cafe. No, it is a two-storey building that will be located several streets away from Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, California.

Apple already run a restaurant called Caffe Mac but this restaurant is open to non-Apple employees as well as Apple employees. An obvious concern of this is that if all the Apple people are chatting away about projects they are working on such as the iPhone 28 then who knows if Mr Samsung, Mrs HTC or Miss Nokia are sitting at the next table pretending to read a newspaper.

The new “Apple only” restaurant will be a separate stand-alone restaurant exclusively for Apple employees who will be free to talk as loud as they like about the latest project they are working on.

I wonder though whether the waiters and waitresses will be using Samsung or HTC phones…

Which is more important to you – the first or last bag?

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It never ceases to amaze me. You’re at an airport, you check-in and then wave goodbye to your luggage. When you arrive at your destination you expect your luggage to arrive on the luggage carousel at the same time you.

I met an old friend last week who was telling me about a situation he faced a few years ago when working on a project at an airport.

The aim of the project was to improve the business process of unloading the bags from the plane and getting them onto the luggage carousel.

This is something we take for granted but the logistics involved are not always that simple and passengers can quickly get frustrated if they don’t get their luggage within a few minutes.

One of the Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s) in place to measure the efficiency of the process was the time it took to get the first piece of luggage from the plane to the luggage carousel.

Now whilst this may sound like a sensible KPI, it was also used to determine the bonus that the luggage handlers would get (the quicker the luggage was delivered the higher the bonus).

Unfortunately for the management of the airport it was also open to abuse.

It may seem obvious now but what was happening was that the baggage handlers were getting the fittest member of their team to literally grab a bag from the hold of the plane and run to the carousel so that the time between landing and the “first luggage on the carousel” was minimal.

Meanwhile, all of the remaining pieces of luggage would be unloaded at a much slower pace.

The end result was happy baggage handlers but unhappy passengers!

Needless to say management soon identified this and the KPI was changed so that it was now the time taken to unload the last bag rather than the first bag that was important.

Would Michael Porter sleep in this bed?

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Michael Porter is arguably the world’s most famous management theorist. His theories such as the 5 forces model and Value Chain Analysis are key parts of the syllabus for several ACCA and CIMA papers.

His generic strategy approach of “differentiation” and “cost leadership” has been around for a number of years and whilst there is a clear argument that a significant proportion of companies are nowadays trying to combine both approaches by aiming to differentiate the product or service whilst at the same time focusing on cost reduction, there is one particular segment of the hotel market that almost certainly has to differentiate to survive.

The boutique hotel segment inherently struggles to compete with the big national and international chains of hotels on the cost leadership approach (these bigger hotel chains will have significant economies of scale for example).

Instead, they will need to be “different” in terms of for example location or “friendliness”.

When it comes to differentiation, the aptly named Jumbo Stay Hotel will be hard to beat for people that are keen on airlines.

Located on a disused runway at Stockholm Arlanda airport, the Hotel is in fact an old Jumbo jet that that has been converted into a luxury hotel. The Jumbo Jet hotel has 27 bedrooms with 76 beds but the best room has to be cockpit which has now been made into a luxury suite with panoramic views of the airport.

The upper deck of the plane which used to house business class passengers is now a cafe serving fresh food and drinks.

We’ve blogged before about Ryan Air’s cost leadership approach to their flights and it’s nice to see a differentiation approach to another part of the airline industry.

Not the best way to start a presentation…

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The IT guys I’ve met in my career have all been very nice people. Admittedly they all seem to be slightly mad and do tend to talk in a strange language with lots of mentions of “coding this and coding that”.

To be fair though they all probably think I’m slightly mad when I talk to fellow finance people in my strange language about “SOCI this and SOFP that”.

If you talk to your IT colleagues though one thing that they tend to take very seriously is the level of security.

Now whilst there are lots of higher level security precautions present such as firewalls and anti-virus programmes there are also some more simple precautions that you should take.

Memory sticks (or USB or flash drives as they are sometime known) can all contain confidential documents and most memory sticks are not password protected.

It pays to double check what’s on the memory stick you’re carrying around with you in case it contains confidential documents and you lose it.

In a similar vein it’s always worth checking what other files are on your flash drive if you’re about to make a presentation.

Unfortunately for Father Martin McVeigh, a Catholic priest in Northern Ireland, he didn’t check what other files were on the flash drive he was going to use when he recently did a presentation to some parents of children at a local primary school.

According to media reports, whilst loading up his presentation for the parents, Father McVeigh inadvertently showed a slideshow of indecent pornographic images onto a screen.

The x-rated slideshow was on the memory stick that Father McVeigh had put into the computer to load up his intended presentation.

Father McVeigh was understandably a bit shocked at seeing the naked pictures on the screen (although to be fair probably not as shocked as the parents in the audience were) and according to the BBC website he was “visibly shaken” and “bolted out of the room”.

He later stated that he didn’t know how the images got onto the memory stick.

And the morale of the story?

Well, I guess that IT security is not just the higher level technical areas but also the more simple areas such as making sure you know what else is on your memory stick…