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If you go to the bank today be careful in case you Kop some abuse for being a toxic asset.

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On Saturday Wayne Rooney the England and Manchester United footballer was dropped for the game against Everton.

According to the Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson, he was dropped so that he wouldn’t have to endure excessive abuse from the Everton fans (whilst the married Mr Rooney has recently gone through a barren patch of scoring on the pitch he was reported in the press last week as having scored off the pitch with a number of prostitutes).

So, the Everton supporters didn’t have the opportunity to direct their witty chants towards Mr Rooney.

The Accountants amongst the Everton supporters though must now be looking forward to when they play their neighbours and fierce rivals, Liverpool.

Last week it was reported that Liverpool FC’s loan with the Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) had been reclassified and moved to RBS’s toxic debt division. In other words the £260 million loan is now within the “bad bank” part of RBS which was created to put all their toxic assets from the recent worldwide financial crisis.

Even though RBS were reportedly getting £1million interest per week on the loan it is now considered clear that they have severe doubts over whether they will get their money back.

We blogged a couple of months ago about the going concern risk with Liverpool FC and this latest news can only add to the excitement.

One thing’s for sure though and the toxic debt division of RBS won’t be very sympathetic with Liverpool and will be looking to recover their money as soon as possible. A quick sale of the football club at a knock down price is expected.

Now, all you accountants in the Everton crowd get your singing voice ready and altogether “You’re toxic and you know you are, you’re toxic and you know you are….”

PwC in the UK have just released their results. So how much did each partner make?

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PricewaterhouseCoopers is a great company. It’s one of the top companies in the world and it’s also a truly global company. The latest reported figures show over 160,000 PwC people working around the world including 8,500 partners.

On Monday PwC released their UK results for the year ended June 2010.

So, how did they do?

First of all the good news. Their turnover in the UK rose 4% to £2.33 billion.

Their profit before tax in the UK however fell 3% to £665 million.

This fall in profit was put down to some significant investment during the year including recruiting 1,750 staff, appointing 57 new partners and moving into a new environmentally friendly office in London (incidentally, there’s a previous blog entry on the proximity of a PwC office to a Ernst & Young office here).

As maybe a positive sign on their view as to which direction the economy is heading they also stated that they were planning on creating 800 new jobs in the UK over the next year as well as continuing with their significant graduate recruitment by taking on 1,200 new graduate level joiners.

Now onto the exciting bit that I’m sure lots of people are interested in and that is what is the average payout for each of the 820 PwC UK partners?

Although it was down by 2% on the previous year it was still a healthy average figure of £759,000 per partner.

PwC’s UK chairman, Ian Powell, was reported as receiving £3.6 million.

Look out for two prostitutes, £3.7 million of stolen cash and a 58 year old accountant at your local Toys R Us store.

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Toys R Us is one of the largest toy store chains in the world.

It’s very successful and has nearly 1,300 stores around the world. What it didn’t have though was a strong internal control system in their UK purchase ledger department.

Between 2006 and 2008, married father of two and accounts payable manager Paul Hopes made over 20 illegal payments ranging from £100,000 to £300,000 to bank accounts of fictitious toy suppliers in the Far East which he had set up himself.

The £3.7 million of illicit money was then spent on various items. One of Mr Hopes favourite methods of spending the money was on Wednesday nights when he would regularly entertain 2 prostitutes at luxury hotel suites.

As well as paying for their time and energy he also bought them a string of luxury cars including a Bentley, Toyota Land Cruiser and a BMW M3 (incidentally, his wife was at the time driving the family Ford Mondeo).

In total he spent nearly £2.5 million on the two prostitutes.

It all came to a sticky ending for Mr Hopes though as he was sentenced to 7 years in jail.

What is interesting about the sentencing is that under the Proceeds of Crime Act the Judge ordered Mr Hopes to repay £3.4 million of the £3.7 million stolen. If he fails to repay the £3.4 million then an additional 10 years will be added to his 7 year sentence. At the end of the 17 year sentence he will still be obliged to repay the £3.4 million.

Now, remember that Mr Hopes is an Accountant so I’m sure he’s an expert in double entry but even the best bookkeeping skills won’t be able to make “income” of £3.7 million minus “expenses” of £2.5 million equal a balance of £3.4 million.

I guess he’s hoping that these two particular ladies are now desperately trying to find him every Wednesday evening to give him the money back.

A previous Ernst & Young award winner (allegedly) held meetings in his underwear, Deloitte resigned and there’s no sign of the cash anywhere…

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Two weeks ago we blogged about Deloitte’s decision to resign as auditors of American Apparel due to amongst other things, problems with stock valuation.

Yesterday, the investor relations department of American Apparel released a press release which included the disclosure that “the Company believes that it is probable that as of September 30, 2010, the Company will not be in compliance with the minimum Consolidated EBITDA covenant under the second lien credit agreement”.

In simple terms this means that it may default on some of its loan payments. This is obviously bad news for all stakeholders of the business as the company may simply not have enough cash to stay in business. Their share price fell by 22% in late trading yesterday.

This is quite a fall from grace for the company and its charismatic founder and CEO, Dov Charney. Back in 2004 at the height of the company’s success Mr Charney won the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the year award.

Mr Charney is one of the real characters of the fashion industry in America and in the past has faced sexual harassment claims as well as allegedly attended interviews and company meetings in his underwear (no doubt American Apparel underwear).

The situation today though is that the company is in negotiations with its creditors to amend the loan agreement to ensure they can stay in business.

It’s looking like the decision by Deloitte to resign was indeed a sound decision. The new auditors, Marcum, will no doubt have some challenges ahead but one thing’s for sure and that is they should issue their invoice to American Apparel now and start chasing up payment straight away.

If it’s “Dress Down Friday” today at Deloitte would you look good in American Apparel clothes?

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It was announced recently that Deloitte has resigned as auditor of American Apparel.

American Apparel is the largest clothing manufacturer in the United States.  The company has expanded substantially outside the USA in recent years, meaning that a material proportion of their sales and inventory happen in territories where US GAAP is not the local requirement.

This appears to have created some problems.  The company was previously audited by Marcum LLP, but it changed auditor to Deloitte on 3 April 2009.  Deloitte had reported an audit opinion and opinion on corporate governance compliance.  These gave an opinion that the company did not have staff outside the USA who were adequately trained in inventory valuation (presumably in inventory valuation in accordance with US GAAP rather than IFRS) and that controls over inventory outside the USA were below the standard that Deloitte considered to be fit for purpose.

Marcum, the previous auditors, had expressed an adverse opinion on the corporate governance report in the financial statements for 2008.  Some saw this as a critical event in the replacement of auditor with Deloitte.

Resigning as auditor is a drastic step that is likely to have an adverse impact on the company’s share price.  American Apparel’s share price nose dived by 25% when the stock market heard of the news of Deloitte’s decision to resign.  Presumably this is because investors have new doubts about the reliability of the company’s historical financial information and future prospects.

As for the name of the proposed replacement for Deloitte?  Apparently, the company’s favoured option is a firm called Marcum LLP…

How can you make a salary of £26,000 stretch to buying a horse riding business, a holiday home, luxury holidays and a Range Rover costing £45,000?

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It seems that not all accountants are 100% honest.

Whilst the vast majority of accountants are  trustworthy there were two court cases in the UK this week that resulted in jail sentences for accountants.

Gary Gordon, who previously worked for the Big 4 firm PricewaterhouseCoopers, stole £45,000 from his employer UK Mission Enterprises. He rather unimaginatively simple diverted the cash into his own accounts.

He apparently had a gambling habit and didn’t appreciate the amount of money that he had stolen. He’s been jailed for 16 months.

£45,000 however pales into insignificance when compared with £1.3 million which was the amount that Tracey Laws stole from her employer Inchcape Limited.

Inchcape Limited is the parent company of a number of motor trading companies in the UK and for nearly 10 years Laws wrote 75 fraudulent cheques totaling £750,000 to her own horse riding school (which she had set up with money that she had already been stolen from her employers). She had also fraudulently transferred over £500,000 to her husband’s decorating company.

Despite having a maximum annual salary of £26,000 during her time with Inchcape she managed to buy a horse riding school, a holiday home, luxury holidays and a brand new Range Rover.

It wasn’t these mis-matched spending habits that caught her out though. Her crime was uncovered by accident when one of the motor trading companies was changing payment systems and two employees noticed a cheque made out to West Acres Stables (the stables owned by Laws).

These two observant individuals noticed that the handwriting looked very much like the handwriting of Tracey Laws. It turned out that it was her hand writing and the end result was that Laws was jailed for four years last week.

No doubt there are new internal controls in place at Inchcape and looking on the bright side for Laws she will at least save her annual accountancy membership fees going forward and she will also have her bed and breakfast supplied free of charge by Her Majesty’s Government for the next few years.

What will make Ernst & Young different from the rest of the Big 4? Will it be an Executive Decision or…

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According to reports this week, Ernst & Young will be the first of the Big 4 to appoint non-executive directors to its global advisory council.

This is a major move for the accountancy profession.

The profession has been under increasing regulatory pressure for a while now and the decision to appoint non-execs is reportedly in response to the new audit firm governance code that was published earlier this year.

The revised Ernst & Young advisory council structure will in broad terms mean that Ernst & Young will have a board structure which is similar to the multi-national companies that are their clients. Their remit will include monitoring strategy and risk.

Their global advisory council currently includes 36 senior partners. These partners will soon be joined by 4 non-executive directors drawn from the business and regulatory world.

The names of these non-execs will be disclosed later this year and although I’m not a betting man I’d probably have a wager that their CVs will not include the names of Deloitte, KPMG or PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Auditors are good at lots of things but could we spot what’s happening to the bees?

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I often believe that society at large does not get best value for money from auditors.

That’s not to say that we deliver bad value for money.  Quite the contrary in fact; audit work does not attract especially high fees, has high costs of provision and very high insurance costs as a result of fairly high risk of litigation.

All of these factors conspire to mean that audit work is often not undertaken by smaller firms of accountants at all – the risk/ return profile is just not good enough.

Today, I noticed that the UK government had committed to spending up to £10 million for urgent research by eminent scientists into why the population of bees and other pollinating insects is rapidly falling.  Answers are needed soon – bees play an essential role in the food chain that we all depend on.

There are significant amounts of money spent on government research and enquiries. For example, the results of an enquiry into the “Bloody Sunday” killings were announced last week.  This enquiry had reportedly cost £100 million in fees, with a further £91 million in disbursements.  It had also taken fourteen years to reach its conclusions.

Now, I rather doubt that most auditors have the scientific skills necessary to determine the reason for bees’ decline, but I suspect that they do have the skills necessary to identify the key assertions by witnesses to the Bloody Sunday killings, obtain and evaluate sufficient, appropriate evidence and then reach a conclusion.

This process is often known by an alternative name of “auditing”.  Our skills are already used in forensic investigations.  I wonder why people don’t think to use us in other situations where establishing facts is so critical?

With our innate focus on VFM audit and the natural sense of urgency that comes from having to report on financial statements within a matter of months, I can’t help but wonder if auditors would have been able to do the job for less than £191 million and sooner than fourteen years.

IFRS 911: Accounting for environmental catastrophes? The BP oil spill illustrates a number of issues in IFRS. Here are just the first few we thought of..

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BP chief executive Tony Hayward was grilled yesterday by the US Congressional panel.

The failure of the Deepwater Horizon drilling platform has been a catastrophe for lots of people. Stakeholders ranging from individual fishermen through to major shareholders have all been severely impacted.

Being natural accountants though, we couldn’t help but think how this would affect the accounts, given that it may well inspire some future exam questions.

The most obvious effect is the impairment of the well itself.  Only the hardware is currently recognised in assets, since the value of the reserves is too uncertain to be recognised as an asset.  Rigs cost vast amounts of money however and this is a significant impairment.

Similar drilling arrangements will also require major safety upgrades.  This would cause an impairment, but no provision, since BP could always simply close down a well.

Then there is goodwill.  BP grew to its vast size by organic growth and by acquisition.  This activity may well have been through an acquired subsidiary.  This is pretty solid external evidence of an impairment and so goodwill must be written off.  Lots of goodwill needs to be written off.

Fines are a near certainty.  The White House has been careful to ensure that the world knows that the $20 billion payment to a trust to settle damages is not a full and final settlement.  This means that an estimate of likely costs will need to be made and disclosed in a very transparent way.  BP and BP’s lawyers would probably prefer to avoid that transparency of how much they think this is going to cost them.

A number of years ago, IAS 10 was amended to require that only dividends that were legally required to be paid could be shown as liabilities.  Many people commented on how this was not true and fair, since it was unthinkable that large companies could ever change their minds about dividends that had already been proposed.  Well, BP changes that a little, given that they have agreed to skip this year’s dividend to shareholders, in response to huge pressure from wider stakeholders such as affected communities and the President of the United States.  It turns out that companies do sometimes change their minds about dividends before the cheques get sent out!

What about recoverability of insurance proceeds?  That one is simple; BP did not have insurance we believe.  Ouch.  Dare we breathe the words “going concern”?

Allegations about two of the Big 4 and “espionage”? Make sure you don’t do this in your exam…

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So the June ACCA exams are finally starting today. After all the hard work students all over the world are facing that unique mixture of excitement, fear and anticipation as they turn over their actual exam papers for the first time.

One thing that really goes without saying though is that when you’re sat in the exam hall you shouldn’t be looking at the person next to you and trying to see what they are writing.

Although exams aren’t being sat in these two particular buildings occupied by PricewaterhouseCoopers and Ernst & Young in London, there have been various allegations recently that the buildings are a little too close for comfort.

Three years ago PwC moved into an office next door to EY. At their closest point the buildings are approximately 10 metres apart. This has led to concerns that the rival companies could spy on each other.

PwC have apparently made the first move to reduce the threat of “espionage”. In order to prevent EY employees spying on them through the windows they have installed automatic blinds that close as soon as audio-visual equipment is turned on. The offices have also been designed so as to prevent any computer screens from being visible through the windows.

EY were reported to be evaluating their options in response.

Whatever the outcome of this is, all of us here at ExP would like to wish you the very best in your exams and sincerely hope that you don’t feel the need to try to spy on your neighbour in the exam! GOOD LUCK.