Bowman’s strategy clock

You get a safe hotel and a great bed. The towels and TV will cost you extra but what about the toilet paper?

Published on: 20 Jul 2014

The Tune Hotel chain has just opened up its first hotel in the UK. The chain already has 7 hotels in Malaysia and 2 in Indonesia and they claim they offer 5 star beds at 1 star prices.

Their policy is to offer the essentials that people look for in a hotel such as safety, cleanliness and comfortable beds whilst at the same time removing a number of “extras” that some customers don’t necessarily want.

With rooms starting at £35 it certainly offers great value for London hotels. It wouldn’t suit everyone’s taste though as some of the things that people take for granted at a hotel are not included in the standard price.

There are a number of optional extras that guests can purchase. A towel for example can be provided for £1.50 per stay whilst the use of a hairdryer will set you back £2. If you want to watch TV you’ll need to pay £3 a day.

If you’re the type of person that likes to take your own towel to a hotel or is relaxed about whether or not you wash then you could end up with a very cheap room.

Whilst this hotel wouldn’t be everyone’s “cup of tea” (incidentally there are no coffee or tea making facilities in the rooms) there will certainly be a market for people that only want a clean and safe hotel room to sleep in and are not bothered about the extras.

In the past we’ve blogged about the BMI Weymouth hospital that was adopting a differentiation approach to business. With Tunes Hotels adopting a hospitality industry equivalent to the low cost airline models of Easy Jet and Ryan Air, this is a great example of either a cost leadership approach or Bowman’s no-frills strategy.

Guests can rest assured though that toilet paper is included in the price and is not an optional extra.

Is it better to spend a penny or save a pound?

Published on: 11 Jun 2013

Love them or hate them but low cost airlines such as Ryan Air and EasyJet are here to stay.

Since low cost airlines entered the airline industry 20 odd years ago they have shaken up the industry.

Easyjet for example now carry more passengers than any other UK airline and the Irish airline Ryanair long ago surpassed the Irish national carrier Aer Lingus in terms of revenue and passenger numbers.

These airline’s business models are classic no-frills low cost models where passengers don’t pay a lot but in return don’t get a lot.

In effect they only get the flight and they have to pay for everything else. Ryanair passengers for example that don’t print out their boarding card at home are charged the princely sum of £40 to have it printed at the airport.

There are reports though that Ryanair are considering taking the no-frills approach to a new level.

To keep the cost of training crew and maintaining spares at a minimum, Ryanair only have one type of plane – a Boeing 737-800. This model of plane has 3 toilets on board but Ryanair want to remove 2 of these toilets so that they can fit an extra 6 seats on the plane. This will then free up space for 6 more fee paying passengers.

Their existing capacity on their standard plane is 189 so removing 2 toilets will raise their passenger capacity by 3%.

Ryanair have reportedly said that the additional revenue generated by this extra passenger capacity could result in the average price of a flight ticket being reduced by £2. There would of course no doubt be extra profit for them as well from these extra passengers.

This extra revenue for them would be pretty good but if you look at it from another viewpoint there could be some uncomfortable logistical issues on board.

With 195 passengers and 6 crew all sharing the one toilet there could be a fairly long queue of people going down the aisle of the plane waiting for the toilet to be freed up.

The risk of a certain type of mid-air accident will no doubt increase although the real worry of course is if you see both pilots at the back of the queue hoping up and down with their legs crossed…

The flight is cheaper than a single piece of paper…

Published on: 31 Jan 2011

Ryanair is Europe’s largest low cost airline.

Their strategy is very much based on cost leadership and is a classic “no frills” approach on the strategy clock model.

In simple terms you don’t pay a lot for the service but at the same time you don’t get a lot. This approach can be very successful when comparing for example to another extreme where you pay a lot but don’t get a lot!

It released its results for the final quarter of 2010 today.

Air traffic control strikes and the bad weather in December were blamed for the Euro 10 million loss that was reported although the company is still confident of achieving full year profits of between Euro 380 million and Euro 400 million for their year ended 31 March 2011.

The average fare during the last quarter was reported as being Euro 34 and this will get you the flight and that’s about it. Extras which require additional payment include taking hold luggage, payment by credit card and seat allocation.

Their whole ethos is to minimise their costs. For example, they have a pretty aggressive policy when it comes to boarding passes.

Their terms and conditions state that passengers must print out their boarding pass at home. If they fail to do so and need one printed out at the airport then Ryanair will charge the passenger £40 to print the one piece of paper.

£40 to print a single piece of paper is pretty high but Ryanair argue that if passengers print out the boarding pass at home then it saves the cost of employing check in staff at the airport.

They have reported that people who forget to print out the boarding pass and are subsequently charged £40 remember to print it the next time.

Of course, it could be that if they’ve been charged £40 for printing one piece of paper then “next time” may well be with another airline as opposed to Ryanair.

If you’re in Australia then of course you can visit the gym at 3am….

Published on: 18 Dec 2009

One of my favourite countries is Australia. I’ve got some good friends there who are lucky enough to be able to enjoy the sunshine, outdoor life and great food that is present in Australia. They are also a very sporty nation being strong in sports such as rugby, cricket and not to forget surfing!

They were visiting London recently and I was chatting to them (in a coffee shop whilst it was raining outside…) and they were talking about a new chain of gyms that has opened in Australia called Jetts Gym. What was unusual about the gym was that it was open 24 hours a day and was focused on providing great exercise equipment but eliminated the “fancier” parts of a health club such as saunas, Jacuzzis and spas.

They kept the quality of the gyms high but managed to reduce costs by using techniques such as:

  • Locating the gyms in residential areas to encourage people to shower and change at home (save costs by not having large changing facilities).
  • Using full time video surveillance and only using staff during the peak times (save on staff costs).
  • Removing expensive items such as Jacuzzis.

There were clear benefits to the customer in having 24 hour access and the cost of membership was approximately half of the price of the average gym membership in Australia.

Using Bowman’s strategy clock model where does Jetts fit?

I would argue that it’s a low price with a medium to high perceived benefit. Are we looking at a Hybrid on the clock?

Either way, I’m not convinced I’d be using a gym at 3 in the morning!

The ExP Group