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The Biggest Rights Issue in UK history

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F9 and P4 students should be aware that there are a variety of ways to raise finance (see chapter 4 of our free F9 ExPress notes. One method is by way of a rights issue where a company issues new shares and sells them to existing shareholders. Shareholders are not obliged to buy them but merely have the “right” to buy them. By being given the “right” they have the security of knowing that their shareholding won’t be diluted by shares being issued to other shareholders without first being offered them.

The Lloyds Banking Group has recently announced the UK’s largest ever rights issue and the bank hopes to raise over £13 billion. Press reports state that the main reason behind the rights issue is to raise sufficient funds to avoid the bank having to take part in the government’s banking insurance scheme that was set up after the recent banking troubles in the UK.

This is going to be an interesting one to watch. Lloyds has nearly 3 million shareholders with the majority being private shareholders. Whether or not these shareholders will be willing to take up these rights remains to be seen. They are due to meet to approve it this coming Thursday. In the run up to the exam though I’m sure students will have more to worry about than the outcome of this vote but make sure you’re aware of the various finance raising methods for the exam!

British Airways and Iberia – suitable, acceptable but is it feasible?

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In last week’s P3 ExPand video I talked about the recent announcement of the British Airways (BA) merger with the Spanish airline Iberia. Some form of merger had been discussed on and off since they held talks in the summer of 2008 but now it’s looking like there could be some movement on this.

Students of Paper P3 will be aware that Johnson & Scholes argue that when evaluating strategic options, 3 major areas should be considered. Namely, is it suitable, is it acceptable and is it feasible?

The aviation industry is extremely competitive. In the current economic environment it is safe to say that the merger would help both companies in terms of synergies and hence from a suitability point of view it appears to work.

This issue of acceptability would need to be examined in the context of the key stakeholders of the firms. BA is quoted on the London stock exchange so some key stakeholders would be some of the big shareholders. The share price rose by 7% following the announcement so the shareholders appeared to like the news.

The final area is that of feasibility. An important issue from the feasibility point of view is whether it would get regulatory approval from the European Commission.

It’s suitable, it’s acceptable but is it feasible? Let’s wait and see what develops.

Anyone got a spare £9.8bn ?

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Mergers & Acquisitions (M&A) are an important part of the ACCA P4 syllabus and are also featured in CIMA F3. Those of you that have read our free ExPress notes (/expand/17-p4_advanced_financial_management.html) will be aware that to minimize the risk of failure in the M&A process, acquiring companies should follow a systematic series of steps prior to launching a bid.

Namely:

1. Clarify strategic reasons for wanting to acquire a company;
2. Draw up a short list of possible takeover targets and select the preferred one;
3. Value the target based on publicly available information and to establish an opening bid;
4. Identify financing options for the transaction

There has been a lot of coverage recently about the attempt by the American food producer Kraft to acquire the British chocolate maker Cadbury.  After Kraft announced their intention to acquire Cadbury, another company (Hersey) announced their interest in acquiring Cadbury.

The sums of money involved are significant. Identifying financing options for the acquisition (point 4 above) is therefore going to be key. Kraft’s bid is £9.8bn and press reports indicate that a syndicate of 8 banks has been brought together to finance the approach. The interesting thing though is that it is reported that these 8 banks have been tied into a non-compete agreement. This means that Hersey cannot approach the same banks to finance their approach. As a result it is going to be more difficult for Hersey to raise such amounts of funds.

Whatever happens over the next few weeks this will be an interesting story to follow.

Do you know your cost of capital?

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The other day I was talking to a few local business owners and I asked them if they knew what their cost of capital was. I got a few blank stares.

When we discussed the issue further, people started to warm up to the idea that the cost of capital can be viewed in terms of opportunity costs:

1. One owner said his cost of capital was the interest rate on his bank loans. I suppose he was 100% debt financed and probably not planning to refinance any time soon! Good luck to him!

2. A second owner said he took out all his savings from the bank and put it into his business. Since the bank deposit rate was so low, he figured his opportunity cost was pretty low as well. He has a point, though he must realize that he has moved into a higher risk category by withdrawing his money from the bank and investing it in a start-up business.

3. Another business owner said he started his company by borrowing from his relatives. Since they haven’t asked for it back he assumes its cost is zero. But he does pay a price, I suppose: at family gatherings he gets dirty looks from his relatives and his wife gives him constant grief. He suspects that the relatives complain about him to his wife.

Since all three owners want to expand their businesses, they asked me if I could recommend new sources of finance. I thought of sending them to our P4 candidates (after the exam!).

A strategic alliance with local farmers.

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I always tell my students that they need to look around at their surroundings to see what is happening and see if they can link it with the  syllabus in any way. Doing this will make it easier to remember concepts and ideas.

I was lucky enough to visit Germany recently to do some work. I noticed an unusual vending machine and it made me think of strategic alliances.

Strategic alliances can come in a variety of forms including the very large formal Joint Ventures such as Sony Ericsson (a 50:50 JV between Sony and Ericsson) and co-operation agreements such as the airline alliances of Sky Team and Star Alliance.

What was unusual about the vending machine that I saw? The thing that caught my eye was that the vending machine sold fresh farmers produce such as milk, eggs and sausages rather than the typical selection of snacks that you would find in vending machines.

Farmers are facing a tough time at the moment. Distribution channels can be a problem for farmers. If they sell through the large supermarket chains they can end up in a weak negotiating position. Selling direct to the customer is something that a lot of farmers don’t have the skills or facilities to undertake.

Some further investigation found out that a number of farms have collaborated with a vending machine manufacturer to stock these machines in several towns in Germany. This alliance is helping both parties. The farmers for example now have a great new distribution outlet. The customers also appear to be pretty happy as they get fresh local produce in a convenient location. The fact that the “middle man” is removed also means that the produce is priced very competitively.

Will we see this expanding to other items and other parts of the world?