Generic strategies

You get a safe hotel and a great bed. The towels and TV will cost you extra but what about the toilet paper?

Published on: 20 Jul 2014

The Tune Hotel chain has just opened up its first hotel in the UK. The chain already has 7 hotels in Malaysia and 2 in Indonesia and they claim they offer 5 star beds at 1 star prices.

Their policy is to offer the essentials that people look for in a hotel such as safety, cleanliness and comfortable beds whilst at the same time removing a number of “extras” that some customers don’t necessarily want.

With rooms starting at £35 it certainly offers great value for London hotels. It wouldn’t suit everyone’s taste though as some of the things that people take for granted at a hotel are not included in the standard price.

There are a number of optional extras that guests can purchase. A towel for example can be provided for £1.50 per stay whilst the use of a hairdryer will set you back £2. If you want to watch TV you’ll need to pay £3 a day.

If you’re the type of person that likes to take your own towel to a hotel or is relaxed about whether or not you wash then you could end up with a very cheap room.

Whilst this hotel wouldn’t be everyone’s “cup of tea” (incidentally there are no coffee or tea making facilities in the rooms) there will certainly be a market for people that only want a clean and safe hotel room to sleep in and are not bothered about the extras.

In the past we’ve blogged about the BMI Weymouth hospital that was adopting a differentiation approach to business. With Tunes Hotels adopting a hospitality industry equivalent to the low cost airline models of Easy Jet and Ryan Air, this is a great example of either a cost leadership approach or Bowman’s no-frills strategy.

Guests can rest assured though that toilet paper is included in the price and is not an optional extra.

Fig salad for starters and I’ll have 2 doctors and 4 nurses for dessert.

Published on: 09 Jan 2014

A top boutique hotel has just opened in London that performs surgery.

Actually, that should really read a top hospital has just opened in London that has all the features of a luxury boutique hotel with the added advantage that it can perform surgical operations.

BMI Weymouth Hospital, just off the world famous Harley Street in central London, has opened with a target market of wealthy (and ill) people. It’s an exclusive private hospital with only 17 beds but 4 state of the art operating suites.

As well as having all the latest medical equipment and medical experts that would be expected at a top hospital it also boasts top chefs and en-suite custom designed rooms with all the latest entertainment systems and original artwork.

Fans of Michael Porter’s generic strategy will recognize this as a clear example of differentiation strategy whereby a “different” service is being provided and hence a premium price can be charged (as opposed to the opposite end of the spectrum where cost leadership exists).

It must be said though that although the hospital certainly looks very luxurious I’m sure that most of its guests would rather they didn’t have to check in.

The Starbucks experience

Published on: 22 Oct 2013

I’m currently sat in a Starbucks coffee shop enjoying a nice coffee and making use of their wifi. It’s got me thinking about the Starbucks phenomena and what strategy they have adopted in terms of growing their business.

CoffeeIt’s an interesting approach and whilst it undoubtedly has been very successful there are commentators that would argue that Starbucks is caught between various approaches.

There are numerous areas of the syllabus which we can link with Starbucks.

To the man on the street, when Starbucks first opened it was different and arguably felt like a very “differentiated approach” (Porter’s generic strategies) to drinking coffee. It served great coffee in a relaxed atmosphere. Good music was played and it felt like a special treat to drink coffee in a select coffee shop.

Their growth plans largely involved a classic market expansion whereby they expanded an existing product into new markets. There are now over 15,000 stores in nearly 50 countries.

They have however had some problems. Last year, they announced that they would close 300 underperforming stores in addition to the 600 closures they announced the year before.

Some people have argued that the expansion of Starbucks resulted in it feeling less “special” and as a result consumers were less willing to pay a premium price for what many felt was a standard product. Was it a case of over-expansion? One memorable headline in the US magazine “The Onion” joked that “New Starbucks Opens in Rest Room of Existing Starbucks”!

Whatever the outcome of their strategy, one thing for sure is that their coffee is nice but not quite as nice as their muffins!

Get rid of the Michelin star and you’ll be a better restaurant…

Published on: 27 Jun 2011

Running a successful restaurant is tough.

Whilst a good restaurant can me it look easy, there are a lot of things you need to get exactly right to be successful. Everything from the ingredients, the menu, the chef, the ambiance and the waiting staff have to be just right.

Plus don’t forget that it’s a very competitive industry with new restaurants popping up all the time.

Perhaps one of the best differentiators a restaurant can hope for is to earn the renowned Michelin star. This award it only given to the most elite of restaurants.

As with a lot of businesses that adopt Porter’s generic strategy of differentiation, creating differentiators comes at a cost.

La Lisita restaurant in the French city of Nimes is run by top chef Olivier Douert and received its first Michelin star in 2006. It has however just done something that many people would consider unthinkable.

Namely, they have voluntarily given back their Michelin star and reverted to a “standard” restaurant.

Surely this is commercial suicide?

Giving up the most prestigious award a restaurant can achieve can’t help the restaurant, can it?

In fact though they may well be better off as a result.

The restaurant has given up the star so that they can reduce their costs to a more reasonable level. There are several requirements for having a Michelin star. These include having a minimum ratio of one waiter for every five to six customers compared to a standard restaurant where the ratio is closer to one waiter for every twenty customers.

It was proving difficult for La Lisita to recover these additional costs as higher spending customers weren’t visiting as often as they were before the financial crisis so they decided to drop the star.

They are still planning on serving great food but under a slightly different model.

Could this be the first of many restaurants that obtain the Michelin star to prove that they can but then revert to a different model to make more money?

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The flight is cheaper than a single piece of paper…

Published on: 31 Jan 2011

Ryanair is Europe’s largest low cost airline.

Their strategy is very much based on cost leadership and is a classic “no frills” approach on the strategy clock model.

In simple terms you don’t pay a lot for the service but at the same time you don’t get a lot. This approach can be very successful when comparing for example to another extreme where you pay a lot but don’t get a lot!

It released its results for the final quarter of 2010 today.

Air traffic control strikes and the bad weather in December were blamed for the Euro 10 million loss that was reported although the company is still confident of achieving full year profits of between Euro 380 million and Euro 400 million for their year ended 31 March 2011.

The average fare during the last quarter was reported as being Euro 34 and this will get you the flight and that’s about it. Extras which require additional payment include taking hold luggage, payment by credit card and seat allocation.

Their whole ethos is to minimise their costs. For example, they have a pretty aggressive policy when it comes to boarding passes.

Their terms and conditions state that passengers must print out their boarding pass at home. If they fail to do so and need one printed out at the airport then Ryanair will charge the passenger £40 to print the one piece of paper.

£40 to print a single piece of paper is pretty high but Ryanair argue that if passengers print out the boarding pass at home then it saves the cost of employing check in staff at the airport.

They have reported that people who forget to print out the boarding pass and are subsequently charged £40 remember to print it the next time.

Of course, it could be that if they’ve been charged £40 for printing one piece of paper then “next time” may well be with another airline as opposed to Ryanair.

The sound of the tills ringing was music to their ears even though there was no music in the shop…

Published on: 01 Dec 2010

Christmas shopping for me is normally a last minute rush before the shops close on 24 December.

This year though I was determined to be organised and last weekend headed off to hit the shops in London’s West End.

It was a pleasant surprise to find that arguably the two most famous shopping streets in London (Oxford Street and Regent Street) were car free as they had been shut to traffic to encourage early Christmas shopping.

Although the streets were closed to traffic the number of shoppers made up for it. It also seemed as though every other shopper walking along Oxford Street was carrying a Primark shopping bag.

For those of you that haven’t heard of Primark, they are a very successful budget clothing brand with 145 shops in the UK together with an additional 62 shops in 6 other countries.

They compete via a classic cost leadership strategy whereby they keep their costs low by way of a variety of business techniques including for example:

•    Purchasing  stock in huge quantities so as to benefit from economies of scale;

•    Only stocking items in popular sizes so as to avoid “using up” valuable shop space with items that don’t sell so well;

•    Minimising advertising spend (why pay models and magazines when they can let their prices do the advertising for them?);

•    Not playing any music in its stores (why pay licence or royalty fees to artists?).

As well as focusing on cost leadership they are masters at “fast fashion”. In other words, they manage the supply chain to get the fashionable styles into the shops as quickly as possible so that they match the very latest designs that are seen on the catwalks and in the fashion magazines.

Gone are the days of fashion having 4 distinct seasons as far as Primark is concerned.

With so many people carrying Primark bags last week then my suspicion was that they were doing very well with their sales.

Press reports yesterday did indeed indicate that Primark did very well at the weekend.

It was reported that they had their most successful one day single shop performance in their 41 year history on Saturday.

The tills at their Oxford Street branch rang up to the tune of £820,000 in the one day.

Whichever way you look at it that’s a pretty good figure for one day’s worth of sales at a single shop.

Their cost leadership approach to strategy seems to be working. As well as their success on Saturday, their reported profits for the 53 weeks to 18 September 2010 showed profits increasing by 35% to £341 million on sales up 18% to £2,730 million.

Forget the great Polish and Russian vodkas, the best vodka in the world is officially English. Now, go and open a packet of crisps to celebrate.

Published on: 10 Sep 2010

At this year’s San Francisco World Spirits Competition the best Vodka in the world award was won by a small distillery based in rural England in Herefordshire. Chase Vodka beat off 115 other entries to win.

This is a superb achievement by them.

I’ve been lucky enough to try some of the vodka. It’s certainly very nice and I have to say I think their award was thoroughly deserved. I hasten to add though that I haven’t tasted the other 115 vodkas so can’t really give an unbiased view!

Chase vodka has got a rather unusual background. It was founded by local potato farmer William Chase. Now William certainly knows a thing or two about potatos. He was the person that founded the upmarket potato crisp company Tyrrells.

Tyrrell’s crisps were only launched 8 years ago in 2002. In classic strategy terminology they were very much promoted on the differentiated manner as being of a better class of crisp, being hand crafted and a top quality product. His passion for potatos paid off and in 2008 he sold 75% of the crisp brand for a rather tasty £40 million.

Not content with sailing the world on his personal yacht or buying a private island to retire to he built on his core competencies and developed his love of potatos into another upmarket brand but this time to be enjoyed by adults only.

Again, using strategy speak the chase vodka business is nicely vertically integrated with the potatos being grown on the farm as well as the distillery and the bottling process being in the same location.

It’s not cheap – retailing at £32.95 it is over 3 times as expensive as the supermarket own brands but it’s hand crafted by a small team of workers and each bottle is reportedly made out of 250 top quality potatos. Comparing this with the mass market vodkas made out of left over grain then you can see why the pricing is different.

Using Ansoff’s matrix terminology they have also undertaken rather nice product development and launched a limited edition Marmalade Vodka.

Now, for me a lovely breakfast is a fresh pot of tea with some nice toast and marmalade. Should I be rethinking things though so that I opt for Marmalade Vodka instead?

Nike and Michael Porter – generically speaking I think it’s somewhere in between…

Published on: 21 Jun 2010

The French football team revolted yesterday and refused to train, football powerhouse Germany lost to Serbia, defending champions Italy failed to beat football minnows New Zealand and England were embarrassing in their game against Algeria on Friday.

At least Nike seem to be getting it right though.

Last week we blogged about the Bavaria girls and their ambush marketing at the World Cup in South Africa.

Nike, which was established in 1962 by Phil Knight who incidentally was an accounting major,  is one of the best companies in the world in terms of getting its marketing just right.

They have a long history of having a certain flair for marketing. After the 1972 Olympic marathon trials for example they proudly announced that 4 of the top 7 finishers had worn Nike shoes. They neatly ignored the fact that the top 3 were wearing Adidas shoes!

Although Adidas are the official sportswear sponsors of the World Cup, Nike are doing rather well in terms of their profile.

Anyone that has seen a World Cup match will no doubt have been drawn to the orange Nike boots that a lot of top players such as England’s Wayne Rooney and Portugal’s Cristiano Ronaldo are wearing.

These boots, or Nike Mercurial Vapor Superfly II Elite boots (retailing at GBP 275) as they are officially known, are arguably catching people’s attention more so than any promotion that Adidas have done at the tournament.

Students of strategy papers will be aware of Michael Porter’s generic strategies whereby organisations compete either by way of cost leadership or differentiation (see our ExPress notes for a refresher if you’re unsure about these terms).

It can be argued however that Nike take the best of both of these approaches.

They focus on the differentiation side of things by investing heavily in R&D, design and marketing. As a result they can charge a premium for being “different”.

On the cost leadership side of things then Nike use external manufacturers rather than internal production. This means that they can source their manufacturing via approved suppliers which they will select for each product on the basis of the best price offered by these suppliers. It enables them to shop around for the best price whilst still guaranteeing the quality.

All in all a very smart business model but I’m sure that fans of the World Cup are more interested in the goals that are scored with these boots rather than the business model behind them.

Christmas parking and Michael Porter.

Published on: 16 Dec 2009

You’re all no doubt undertaking some “last minute” revision in the run up to the P3 exam next Wednesday.

Christmas is fast approaching and I always tend to leave my shopping to the “last minute”. Christmas Eve for me is normally a mad rush around the shops trying to buy presents before the shops close. This year I’m determined that it’s going to be different.

I drove into town nice and early yesterday to try to beat the rush of Christmas shoppers but alas it seemed that everyone else had the same idea. Parking is always a problem near Christmas but there were two temporary car parks that had opened up for Christmas.

One was a large open area about 20 minutes walk from the main shopping area. You paid your money to park and simply parked wherever you could. The other one was closer to the shopping area and they actually washed your car whilst you were shopping.

Whether it’s me still being in the P3 mode but the first thing I thought about when I saw the car parks was Porter’s Generic Strategy. Out of the two car parks which one do you think was a cost leadership approach and which one was a differentiation approach? Put it this way, the car park close to the shopping area where they washed your car was 3 times the price of the other one so one of them was charging a premium price for a “different” product.

Best of luck in your exams on Wednesday!

The ExP Group