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Do you own a iPhone or is it a Hiphone, an Ephone or a Ciphone?

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On Saturday Apple officially launched the iPhone 4 in China. They also opened up two new flagship stores in Shanghai and Beijing.

China is the world’s largest mobile market with more than 800 million subscribers so it would seem to make sense that Apple sell their products there.

Why has is taken them so long to launch the iPhone 4 in China though? After all, the iPhone 4 was originally launched in the US back in June and in countries such as Australia, Netherlands and Singapore in July.

The handsets themselves are manufactured in China so it’s not as though they haven’t had any experience of doing business in the country.

There are various reasons why companies have phased product roll outs in different countries. The sheer scale of a “global launch” for a company like Apple would be extremely challenging. Having sufficient inventory in stock on global launch day would not only be a logistical nightmare but would probably be physically impossible.

An additional challenge for Apple is that they need to agree matters with their strategic communication service providers in each territory (in other words, the mobile phone operator they will be partnering with in each particular country). This also takes time.

Anyway, from now onwards we’ll be seeing the iPhone 4 in China but anyone that has been to China recently though could be forgiven for thinking that the iPhone 4 has already been in the country for a while.

A significant issue for Apple is the increase in the number of iPhone clone companies.

As well as clone companies that produce illegal fake copies of the phone there are also businesses that produce reasonable quality phones which are very similar to the iPhone. They are designed so that they try not to break any patent protection that Apple has set up. I’m sure though that Apple’s patent lawyers are monitoring these products very closely!

A quick search on the internet for example shows websites selling products such as the HiPhone, the Ephone and the Ciphone. With prices starting at less than $100 there will be a significant number of people opting for these items.

Oh, and in case you were wondering the photo above is of the Hiphone.

Is this your shopping list: bread, milk, eggs and Viagra?

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Monday could be a big day for a lot of people.

Tesco, one of the leading UK supermarkets, will commence selling the erectile dysfunction drug Viagra.

Viagra has been a huge success for Pfizer. It’s one of their blockbuster drugs and millions of the little blue tablets have been sold over the last 10 years.

One of the drawbacks though for a lot of men that want the drug is where to get hold of it from. In the UK you generally need either a doctors prescription or to risk buying it from potentially suspect internet sites.

Tesco are one of the most successful supermarket chains in the world. In strategic Ansoff’s Matrix terminology they have done very well with market development (4,811 stores in 14 countries with an amazing 2,482 stores in the UK alone) together with product development (an estimated 40,000 product lines ranging from pizza to petrol to perfume).

Tesco are about to add another product line to their offerings and from next Monday shoppers will be able to pick up Viagra from over 300 Tesco stores.

As finance people we know all about the challenge of getting pricing decisions right.

Tesco are not the first mainstream chain of stores to stock Viagra. Last year, the high street chemist Boots became the first store in the UK to sell Viagra without a prescription. You can currently buy 4 of the blue pills from Boots for £55.

A price skimming or premium pricing strategy for Tesco wouldn’t really work as the Viagra market is a mature market. Tesco has instead undertaken a classic penetration pricing strategy whereby they price the product at an attractive price with the aim of growing its market share.

From Monday, you will be able to buy 8 of the blue pills at Tesco for £52.

Whilst the per tablet charge at Tesco is a lot lower than what can be found at Boots, £52 is still a significant amount of money. There’s a recession on and times are hard for a lot of people. Only time will tell whether Tesco made the correct pricing decision.

Forget the great Polish and Russian vodkas, the best vodka in the world is officially English. Now, go and open a packet of crisps to celebrate.

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At this year’s San Francisco World Spirits Competition the best Vodka in the world award was won by a small distillery based in rural England in Herefordshire. Chase Vodka beat off 115 other entries to win.

This is a superb achievement by them.

I’ve been lucky enough to try some of the vodka. It’s certainly very nice and I have to say I think their award was thoroughly deserved. I hasten to add though that I haven’t tasted the other 115 vodkas so can’t really give an unbiased view!

Chase vodka has got a rather unusual background. It was founded by local potato farmer William Chase. Now William certainly knows a thing or two about potatos. He was the person that founded the upmarket potato crisp company Tyrrells.

Tyrrell’s crisps were only launched 8 years ago in 2002. In classic strategy terminology they were very much promoted on the differentiated manner as being of a better class of crisp, being hand crafted and a top quality product. His passion for potatos paid off and in 2008 he sold 75% of the crisp brand for a rather tasty £40 million.

Not content with sailing the world on his personal yacht or buying a private island to retire to he built on his core competencies and developed his love of potatos into another upmarket brand but this time to be enjoyed by adults only.

Again, using strategy speak the chase vodka business is nicely vertically integrated with the potatos being grown on the farm as well as the distillery and the bottling process being in the same location.

It’s not cheap – retailing at £32.95 it is over 3 times as expensive as the supermarket own brands but it’s hand crafted by a small team of workers and each bottle is reportedly made out of 250 top quality potatos. Comparing this with the mass market vodkas made out of left over grain then you can see why the pricing is different.

Using Ansoff’s matrix terminology they have also undertaken rather nice product development and launched a limited edition Marmalade Vodka.

Now, for me a lovely breakfast is a fresh pot of tea with some nice toast and marmalade. Should I be rethinking things though so that I opt for Marmalade Vodka instead?

“There’s no such thing as a free lunch” but will there be such a thing as a free drink or cheap drink in the future?

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Binge drinking in the UK is a major problem. City centres at the weekend can be full of people that are literally trying to drink as much as possible in as short a period of time. Violence and health issues often ensue.

As well as the disturbances to local residents there are also the costs both health-wise to the drinkers and financially to police forces, hospitals and society at large arising as a result of this binge drinking.

As a potential solution to this problem, the government is currently investigating whether to ban free or cheap drink promotions. One of the ideas being discussed is whether to make it illegal to sell alcohol below cost price. In other words to prevent businesses offering “loss leaders” on drinks so as to encourage higher spending at a later date.

If you’re an accountant, and assuming you’re not reading this in the middle of an actual binge drinking session yourself, this raises an interesting discussion on what exactly is meant by “below cost” and in particular the term “cost”.

The major alcoholic drinks manufacturers produce a range of drinks. Diageo for example produce drinks as varied as Smirnoff vodka, Johnnie Walker whisky and the famous Irish stout Guinness.

Identifying the cost of each particular drink would be challenging exercise. Whilst they no doubt have sophisticated management accounts which allocate overheads and indirect costs in certain ways, there would be a clear debate as to which was the “correct” allocation of these costs.

Apportioning overheads such as head office costs, R&D and marketing to individual products would result in a certain amount of flexibility in terms of identifying the cost figure to use for “below cost” purposes.

One solution to this inherent problem of identifying the cost of individual products has been proposed and that is setting the minimum cost of the drinks as equivalent to the duty and VAT that needs to be paid on the particular drinks.

So, the next time you’re out having a quiet drink with some non finance friends feel free to start a discussion about how much each of your drinks cost to make. You can then explain about the various possible methods of allocating indirect costs. Then again, talking about management accounting cost allocation whilst out with your friends may result in your  non finance friends starting a binge drinking session themselves…

Things are getting more expensive in China but is this good news for McDonalds?

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A report issued by Credit Suisse this week highlighted the fact that costs of manufacturing in China are on the increase.

Average salaries for example have increased from $1,000 per annum in 2000 to nearly $4,000 in 2010. This increase, together with the cost of transporting goods to Europe and America, means that the cost base has increased significantly and importantly is likely to continue to increase.

A number of companies have invested in China principally on the basis of their low cost base.  The rising cost base though is causing concern for a number of companies.

Will they be able to switch production to other low cost locations such as Bangladesh or Vietnam? They probably will be able to but it could be costly.

Will they be able to pass on these cost increases to the end consumer by way of price increases? Given that we are only just starting to come out of recession my guess is that this will be challenging to say the least.

But does all of this really come as a surprise? With the explosion of globalisation over the last couple of decades and companies manufacturing in cheaper location or “off shoring” services then surely it’s simply a case of supply and demand.

If companies set up offshore operations in a certain territory which is renowned for having, for example, good quality cheap IT skills then when other companies join them there will be a surge in demand for these individuals and wages will increase.

It will take a number of years or even generations but some people’s view is that eventually there will be very similar wage levels wherever you are in the world.

Back to the increase in wages in China though and whilst this will be bad news for a number of companies there will also be companies that will benefit from the increase in local spending power. McDonalds for example are no doubt licking their lips in anticipation at all the Big Macs that could well be sold in China in the near future.

Is this the real Willy Wonka? After all he bought enough chocolate on Friday to make over 5 billion bars of chocolate.

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Anthony Ward, a British financier who set up hedge fund Armajaro Holdings, bought a huge chunk of chocolate on Friday.

To be precise, he spent over £650 million buying 241,000 tonnes of cocoa beans.

This was the highest single purchase of cocoa for nearly 15 years and happened as cocoa bean prices rose to their highest level for 23 years. On news of the purchase cocoa futures for July delivery jumped by 1.5%.

The trade took place on Liffe (the London International Financial Futures and Options Exchange), a market which trades contracts in commodities such as sugar, coffee and cocoa.

As well as the sheer size of the transaction the strange thing about it was that Mr. Ward’s company has actually taken delivery of the cocoa. This is very unusual as the vast majority of cocoa transactions normally involve traders exchanging option or futures contracts without actually taking possession of the beans.

So why has he purchased so much chocolate?

He’s a very astute and wealthy businessman who reportedly lives in a £10 million house in Mayfair, London.

The speculation is that he is stockpiling huge volumes of cocoa in order to be in a strong negotiating position. Harvests in the cocoa heartlands of Ghana and Ivory Coast have recently been weak and there is an increase in demand for chocolate in the Chinese and Indian markets.

It looks like chocolate prices are on the rise so what better excuse for me to stock up on some chocolate before the price rises. Somehow though I don’t think my stockpile will be anywhere near Mr. Wards…

Are Go-GO Hamsters skimming into my Christmas shopping?

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My 9 year old niece is a lovely girl and has some great characteristics. One of my favourites is that she’s a determined little girl who knows exactly what she wants! Christmas is fast approaching and top of her Christmas present list this year is a “Go-Go Hamster”.

For those of you outside of the UK you may not have heard of these toys. They are small battery operated hamsters with a retail price of £10. They are the latest must have toys for Christmas. I was determined not to leave Christmas shopping until the last minute this year and went off in search of some Go Go Hamsters. A slight problem however in that the shops have sold out of them! The big chains such as Toys R Us have sold out and even exclusive Hamleys in London has sold out.

A quick look on certain websites such as E-bay however shows that it is in fact possible to buy Go Go Hamsters. Some are being sold for more than £50 which when comparing to their retail price is a hefty mark up.

Anyway, back to ACCA Paper F5 and CIMA P2 and what exactly does my Christmas shopping list have to do with these papers? Students should be aware that Price skimming is where prices are set at a high price to catch customers willing and able to pay the price. Are we seeing an unofficial price skimming approach by individuals selling Go Go Hamsters?? Some may argue that it is simply individuals taking advantage of supply and demand and selling at a profit. The important thing for paper F5 though is to be aware of the concept of price skimming as well as all the other pricing strategies that a company can adopt (if you’ve forgotten then have a quick look at pages 14 and 15 of our ExPress notes).

In conclusion, I won’t tell you whether I actually bought a Go Go Hamster or not in case a certain 9 year old niece is studying F5 at an early age….

Thinking of Christmas already?

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Pricing is an important area of ACCA and CIMA. There are a variety of pricing methods discussed in the syllabus including customer based pricing and competition based pricing. Broadly speaking, the former is based on the amount that customers would be willing to pay for benefits whilst the latter involves setting prices based on the prices of competing products.

In the UK, the Toy Retailers Association has just released their list of the top 12 toys that they expect to be most in demand in the UK this coming Christmas.

The interesting thing about the list is that the average price of the toys is just over £26. This compares to an average price of £32 in the Christmas 2007 list. This represents a fall of nearly 20%.

Has this fall been driven by cost savings by the manufacturer on labour or material? Or maybe reductions in transport and storage costs?

My guess is that the toy manufacturers are aware of the recession and the impact on parents buying power (customer based pricing issue). They are also aware that the toy industry is an extremely competitive industry and at the moment their competitors will be offering cheaper products (competition based pricing).

Either way, I’m sure that there won’t be a lot of children debating this issue on Christmas day when they open their presents!