June 2013

Momo is certainly a unique lady…

Published on: 21 Jun 2013

Discrimination in the workplace due to gender, race, religion or sexual preference is not only unethical but is also illegal in most countries.

police_dogImportantly though if an organisation does undertake discriminatory activities in for example deciding not to recruit certain people it can miss out on good quality employees from the “excluded segment” of the population.

Now whilst the following example isn’t covered by any discrimination legislation it does provide an interesting example of how an organisation would have missed out if this lady had been discriminated against and prevented from doing the job she loves.

“Momo”, or Peach in English is special for a number of reasons.

She has succeeded in what is an extremely competitive environment. Some would say that her work environment was a heady macho mixture of fitness and controlled aggression.

Most of her colleagues are significantly bigger and stronger than her but she has persevered so much so that she graduated with full honours and now is very much an equal with her male work colleagues.

Momo is special for another reason. She is the first police dog that is a Chihuahua.

Yes, Momo is a 3 kg (6.6lb) Chihuahua dog that has just passed her exams to become a police dog in the Japanese prefecture of Nara.

Now whilst most of her colleagues will be large powerful dogs, her employers didn’t discriminate against her and as a result have a tremendous resource.

She won’t be used for security roles but rather in search and rescue operations in disasters such as earthquakes where her small size will enable her to squeeze into small spaces to look for trapped people.

Had they discriminated against her they would have missed out on this skill set.

If you’re a single lady, should you get a red car?

Published on: 18 Jun 2013

Despite car companies spending millions on R&D and new product launches one of the first questions people tend to ask if you say you’ve bought a new car is “what colour is it?”

Up until recently the most likely answer to that question would have been “silver”.

However, after 10 years at the top of the popularity car colour charts silver has fallen to the number 2 position.

The most popular car colour according to leading transportation coatings company, PPG Industries, is now white.

According to their figures 21% of this year’s new cars across the globe have been finished in white.

There are however some regional differences. Namely:

Asia/Pacific – silver 25%, white 23% and black 17%

Europe – black 26%, white 19% and silver 16%

North America – white 20%, silver 19% and black 18%

According to a PPG survey, more than 75% of car buyers said exterior colour was a factor in their purchase decision but as the above figures show though there doesn’t appear to be a huge variety in colours with the 3 main colours of white, black and silver dominating.

But what about the colour red though? After all, our ExP logo has a big red dot in the middle so we like the colour red.

Well, an interesting study in the European Journal of Social Psychology has identified that if a lady wants to make herself more attractive to men then she should consider wearing more red colours.

The study concludes that

“In two experiments, we investigate an analogous effect in humans, specifically, whether red on a woman’s shirt increases attraction behavior in men. In Experiment 1, men who viewed an ostensible conversation partner in a red versus a green shirt chose to ask her more intimate questions. In Experiment 2, men who viewed an ostensible interaction partner in a red versus a blue shirt chose to sit closer to her

No doubt the marketeers are already onto this so does this mean that we’ll now see car companies starting to promote red cars for single ladies?

Would it make the news if you lost your laptop and mobile phone? It would certainly be a risk…

Published on: 14 Jun 2013

Some people have a lot of free time.  Some of them use it for recreational purposes and others use it to make requests to UK government bodies under the Freedom of Information Act.

An interesting Freedom of Information Act discovery that was recently published on, perhaps surprisingly, the BBC news website is that BBC staff lost laptops, mobile phones and similar devices last year to the value of £241,019.  That is really rather a lot of laptops.

The fact that somebody saw fit to make the request of the BBC shows how diverse the Corporation’s stakeholders can be and how surprisingly interested seemingly external or unconnected stakeholders can be.  Having to admit to losing property that ultimately belongs to the public of such a high value doesn’t do much for reputation.

Using the TARA (transfer, avoid, reduce, accept) framework for risk management much beloved of the ACCA Paper P1 examiner, an appropriate response to this risk might be to try to “reduce” it.  This is because it is something that is likely to happen, but would probably be assumed to have limited impact on the business.

However, if something changes, such as the introduction of legislation that allows the public to obtain answers to questions that the BBC would really probably prefer weren’t asked, the reputational damage risk may become greater.  This would then lift the TARA response to “avoid”, since the impact on the business would now be high and probability high.  This may mean that the policy changes from providing smartphones for staff to requiring them to buy their own and pay part of their bill in expenses.

It’s just a little illustration of how stakeholders can have surprising effects on a business.

So then, do you know where your laptop and smartphone are right now?  Go check.

Is it better to spend a penny or save a pound?

Published on: 11 Jun 2013

Love them or hate them but low cost airlines such as Ryan Air and EasyJet are here to stay.

Since low cost airlines entered the airline industry 20 odd years ago they have shaken up the industry.

Easyjet for example now carry more passengers than any other UK airline and the Irish airline Ryanair long ago surpassed the Irish national carrier Aer Lingus in terms of revenue and passenger numbers.

These airline’s business models are classic no-frills low cost models where passengers don’t pay a lot but in return don’t get a lot.

In effect they only get the flight and they have to pay for everything else. Ryanair passengers for example that don’t print out their boarding card at home are charged the princely sum of £40 to have it printed at the airport.

There are reports though that Ryanair are considering taking the no-frills approach to a new level.

To keep the cost of training crew and maintaining spares at a minimum, Ryanair only have one type of plane – a Boeing 737-800. This model of plane has 3 toilets on board but Ryanair want to remove 2 of these toilets so that they can fit an extra 6 seats on the plane. This will then free up space for 6 more fee paying passengers.

Their existing capacity on their standard plane is 189 so removing 2 toilets will raise their passenger capacity by 3%.

Ryanair have reportedly said that the additional revenue generated by this extra passenger capacity could result in the average price of a flight ticket being reduced by £2. There would of course no doubt be extra profit for them as well from these extra passengers.

This extra revenue for them would be pretty good but if you look at it from another viewpoint there could be some uncomfortable logistical issues on board.

With 195 passengers and 6 crew all sharing the one toilet there could be a fairly long queue of people going down the aisle of the plane waiting for the toilet to be freed up.

The risk of a certain type of mid-air accident will no doubt increase although the real worry of course is if you see both pilots at the back of the queue hoping up and down with their legs crossed…

Look on the bright side. At least it smells nice…

Published on: 08 Jun 2013

Have you ever dropped a cup of coffee at work? What about spilling a glass of water?

Maybe a more interesting question to ask a forklift truck driver that (currently) works for the Kerry Logistics in Australia is “have you ever dropped a container full of 462 cases of a customer’s wine that were worth £664,000 and all the bottles were smashed?”

Unfortunately for this unlucky forklift truck driver the answer is yes.

The container held 2010 Mollydooker Velvet Glove Shiraz bottles of wine produced by winemaker Sparky Marquis which sell for £122 each.

Mr Marquis told reporters that he was “gut wrenched” that the wine bottles had been smashed. The container held one third of his winery’s annual production and was destined for delivery to the United States.

There are two important business lessons to be learnt from this.

Firstly, always make sure that valuable items are insured. Sensibly the wine was insured so the winemaker won’t be out of pocket.

Secondly, there’s no harm in having a sense of humour.

Mr Marquis was quoted as saying that when the logistics company opened up the container “they said it was like a murder scene.” With a touch of classic Australian humour he added “but it smelled phenomenal”

Author Robert Louis Stevenson once wrote “Wine is bottled poetry”.

I can imagine the words that came out of the forklift driver’s mouth when the container was dropped were anything but poetry.

The ExP Group