March 2016

Grab your goat and let’s go…

Published on: 26 Mar 2016

Creativity and innovation in any organisation should always be welcome and whilst technology is often at the forefront of innovation it is sometimes the really simple ideas that can create benefits.

Unfortunately, in this particular situation it didn’t quite go according to plan.

The initial idea was good. Officials in charge of the 1,200 acre Minto-Brown Island Park in Oregon in America were concerned that several invasive plants were taking over the park and killing off a number of the native flora including maple and hazelnut trees.

The solution put forward was to create a crack team of 75 goats who would eat the invasive plants such as the Armenian blackberry and the English Ivy which would then mean that the native flora would thrive.

75 goats were duly obtained from a company called Yoder Goat Rentals (as an interesting aside I wonder how many of you were aware that you could rent a team of goats. I certainly wasn’t.)

The goats got down to work but 6 weeks later the project was cancelled.

There were a number of issues.

Firstly, the goats were fairly relaxed about what they ate. In terms of the invasive Armenian blackberry for example they decided to eat the tasty blackberry leaves but left the prickly bramble. This resulted in the plant carrying on growing.

Secondly, they didn’t show any distinction between the (tasty) maple and hazelnut trees which they were supposed to be helping and the invasive plants.

Thirdly, the total cost of the 6-week pilot programme was $20,719 which was nearly 5 times the $4,245 cost for a normal parks maintenance man supported by a prison inmate work crew.

Finally, according to a report to the city council the goats “had a barnyard aroma”.

In summary, a nice try but it didn’t quite work. Still, as any successful business person will surely agree, you don’t progress unless you try. Better luck next time and at least the goats had a nice 6-week holiday in a lovely park…

Nightclubs and lemons

Published on: 19 Mar 2016

What have nightclubs and lemons got in common? The answer may not be that obvious but the common link is the “inflation basket” of the 700 most used goods and services which the Office for National Statistics (ONS) uses to determine price movements for the inflation rate.

This inflation basket dates back nearly 70 years and the ONS currently uses around 180,000 separate price quotations for goods and services within the basket every month to come up with an inflation number for the whole UK economy.

Each year the items within the basket are updated to take account of changes in consumers spending patterns and a dozen or so items are added or dropped from the basket.

This year nightclubs have been removed from the basket as the younger generation are now preferring to do other things rather than go to nightclubs.

In the last 10 years the number of nightclubs in the UK has fallen from over 3,000 to less than 1,750.

In a great illustration of the impact that changes in the PESTEL environmental analysis model can have, there are several reasons for the decline in nightclubs including:

Economic – student grants have been replaced by student loans and as a result the students themselves now have less money to spend on expensive nightclub drinks.

Social – socialising with friends now more and more involves social media. Why meet up in a dark nightclub when you can Snapchat for example? Also, very dark nightclubs will limit the opportunities for photos for your Facebook feed…

Technology – whereas in the past people would often go to nightclubs to meet new people, websites such as the dating site Tinder now make it easier to meet new people without having to go to the trouble of trying to communicate with someone by shouting at the top of your voice in a nightclub which is so dark you can hardly see the person you’re shouting at…

Legal – the smoking ban imposed in recent years has impacted on the number of smokers who go to nightclubs (incidentally, electronic cigarette refills have been added to the basket this year following the increase in popularity of e-cigarettes)

What about lemons? Well Lemons have been added to the basket.

An increase in the popularity of home cooking driven by all of the cooking programmes currently on TV has led to a surge in demand for lemons.

So lemons are in and nightclubs are out.

Other changes include the removal of GPS satnavs for cars (more people are using their smartphones for directions) and the addition of mobile phone covers.

In case you’re interested here are the full details of the basket and how it is compiled.

What’s in a name?

Published on: 10 Mar 2016

The Indian car manufacturer Tata Motors, part of the Tata Group, one of India’s largest conglomerates recently skilfully averted what could have been a major international marketing mistake.

Tata motors, who also own the Land Rover and Jaguar brands, are about to launch a new small hatchback car. They debuted it at the recent 2016 Auto Expo as the Zica (short for Zippy Car) but following the rapidly spreading Zika virus which has infected over a million people in Latin America and which was declared an international health emergency, they decided to change the name to avoid any unwanted links between the two names.

The car will now be launched as the Tiago and the change was impressively dealt with by the company. They reacted quickly to the similarity and ran a competition via social media for the public to choose the new name. Over 30,000 names were put forward in the competition but Tiago was selected by the public as the winner.

However, if you look up the definition of Tiago in the Urban Dictionary the top two definitions are firstly, “Tiago is a great Portuguese king” and secondly “Tiago is a sex God who is…”.

I’m not sure the Tata marketing guys looked at the Urban Dictionary before agreeing to Tiago but in any case, if you see a man driving a Tiago then surely he’s either the Portuguese king or a sex God…

The ExP Group