IFRS 3

Forget who’s in charge of the TV remote control, who’s in control of the TV channels?

Published on: 25 Oct 2010

BSkyB is the largest broadcaster in the UK, reporting a profit of £11.7 million on revenues of £5.9 billion in its most recent financial statements.

Its ownership structure is dominated by News Corporation, the transnational media conglomerate owned by Rupert Murdoch, whose other ventures include numerous newspapers and Fox studios in the USA.

It’s fair to say that Rupert Murdoch is a controversial figure.

A review of the most recent financial statements shows that News Corporation presently owns approximately 39.1% of the shares of BSkyB.  The next two largest shareholders own 5.02% and 3.01% of the votes in the company.

In other words, resisting the might of News Corporation to impose its will on BSkyB would require something more akin to a peasants’ revolt than a more standard company vote in the AGM.

IFRS 3 defines a subsidiary as an entity that is controlled by another entity.

Looking at the evidence, it would appear that the 39.1% ownership would be enough to give control of BSkyB to News Corporation, on grounds that it would be almost impossible to resist decisions favoured by such a dominant investor.

One such decision was appointing James Murdoch, son of Rupert Murdoch as chairman of BSkyB.  Lots of investors didn’t like this, but Murdoch took the helm of the company.

News Corporation produces its financial statements under US GAAP and has always consolidated BSkyB using the equity method, as an associate.

Under IFRS, it would have been arguable that full consolidation as a subsidiary would have presented a more true and fair view, as IFRS uses more principles based recognition of control than US GAAP.

However, a shock recently came to News Corporation, when it tried to increase its holding from 39.1% to a clearly controlling 61%.

The board of BSkyB refused to agree with the chairman that an offer of 700p per share should be accepted.  The board defied its biggest investor and said that they would recommend refusal of any offer less than 800p.  This appears to have come rather as a surprise to the dominant Murdoch family, who show signs of thinking of BSkyB as their fiefdom.

It’s just a nice example of when apparent control is not control and thus how to be cautious in deciding when to consolidate a company as a subsidiary, even if it generally does everything you tell it to.  If there appears to be a chance of the other investors saying “enough” and refusing to give into your will, it’s not a subsidiary.

They’re merging with a competitor so surely it must be a merger? In fact it’s not a merger but…

Published on: 17 May 2010

The troubled US airline industry is going through a period of consolidation.  Consolidation in the sense of companies getting together to reduce their fixed costs per transaction, not consolidation in the sense of producing group accounts.

This article, however, is about group accounts.  The circumstances of the Continental/ United merger do make it look like it’s a voluntary merger and the stock market was conspicuously unsurprised at the news.

The problem is that IFRS 3 requires that for all new business combinations (a new business combination is one that doesn’t arise from a reconstruction of a pre-existing group), an acquirer and acquiree is identified.  This company is then the parent.  Often, a merger happens by a share-for-share exchange and the new parent chooses to change its name to a suitably “merged” sounding name.  But as far as the rules are concerned, one must be the acquirer and the other the acquiree.

So a decision will need to be made about which company becomes the parent. It’s likely that this will be the company with the greater retained earnings.  It’s also likely that formal merger will happen on the first day of the parent’s accounting period, so that a full year of “merged” profits is consolidated.

The group retained earnings of the new group will certainly be less than the sum of their individual parts, since the acquiree’s pre-acquisition profits will not be consolidated.

This may seem harsh if it’s truly a genuine merger, since the idea of pre-acquisition reserves should perhaps be restricted to where there’s a genuine acquisition.  So why is this option not allowed?  You can probably guess – it was subject to creative interpretation of what constituted a merger.  The IASB stated that they believed genuine mergers would probably happen globally about once every five years.

Perhaps Continental/ United is one such genuine merger?

Xerox Corporation and Affiliated Computer Services (BPO world leader) unveil planned new business combination

Published on: 04 Nov 2009

Everybody is calling it a merger, but do mergers really exist? And from what date does the combination happen?

Key aspect 1: Determining if IFRS 3 applies and identifying the acquirer.

IFRS 3 applies only to combinations as a result of which an entity (identified as “the acquirer”) obtains “control” of “the acquiree”. Is that the case?

Yes: Xerox is set to acquire 100% of ACS, with ACS expected to “continue to operate as an independent organisation” (branded “ACS, a Xerox Company”) and with Lynn Blodgett (ACS CEO) reporting to Ursula Burns (Xerox CEO).

Key aspect 2: Determining the acquisition date

IFRS 3 requires the combination to be acquisition accounted for at the date when control is obtained. Is the “acquisition date” determinable based on released information?

Not quite: the agreement was signed by the two boards on 28.09.09, but the transaction is “expected to close” by the end of Q1-2010.

Key aspect 3: Recognising and measuring the consideration transferred

IFRS 3  requires consideration transferred to be fair valued at acquisition date, with any transaction costs being expensed and not included as part of the consideration. How does it work in the case?

Xerox is set to pay $18.6 in cash and issue 4.9 shares in exchange of 1 ACS share. Considering share prices on the eve of the deal being announced, such consideration would have amounted to $6.2 billion. However, due to the subsequent fall in Xerox’ share price , the fair value of the agreed consideration went down to $5.5 billion. By the “acquisition date”, the fair value of this consideration may again vary. As to the costs of issuing the new shares raising the $3 billion expected to be needed to finance the deal, IFRS 3 would want them expensed in acquirer’s books and NOT considered as part of the consideration paid (and, therefore, potentially capitalised as goodwill).

The ExP Group